Fujifilm XF 35mm F2.0 review – The Best Lens for The One Lens Set Up

When I have switched my camera system from Canon to Fujifilm a while back, I was also looking to expand and experience my lens choice. Before when I was using my EOS 500D, I had the kit 18-55mm and 55-250mm as I thought a zoom set-up will give me the most bang for the buck. But as I transit to Fujifilm, I noticed they seem to have put a lot of focus on their prime lens collections. With choices such as the F1.4 lineup or their more compact counterpart F2.0 lineup, I am intrigued as they say a prime lens is usually sharper, faster and cheaper. After some internal debate, I picked the XF35mmF2 for its compact size, weather sealing, fast focus and close to 50mm full-frame equivalent focal length.

Build Quality

Kudos to Fujifilm, when you hold this lens in your hands, quality is the first thing that springs to mind. It is full metal construction, even for the textured aperture ring and focus ring. The aperture ring is smooth with a nice click to it. Same as the focus ring, it is well dampened but not too hard to turn. It comes with a small metal lens hood. I am not sure it actually does much in terms of preventing glares and flares, but certainly does a good enough job to protect the glass. Truth be told, I am not a huge fan of this tapering, stumpy design of the lens so the hood kind of make it balance a bit better. Although the lens hood somehow makes it a bit more difficult to put the lens cap on. I am just being pernickety here…

It apparently has 8 seals in the lens body to help makes it weather-sealed and still works in -10˙C.

Spec

Dimension (Diameter x Length)60mm x 45.9mm
Weight170g
Focal Length35mm (53mm Full-Frame equivalent)
Element/Group9/6
ApertureF2.0 – F16
Filter Size43mm

Real-world test and review

If you are looking for the kind of technical review that takes picture of a brick wall, pixel peep to tell you which part of the lens is sharp, how much vignette you get at what stop, I am sorry to disappoint. They just aren’t important to me in the real world use of the lens. Modern days lens are all very sharp, arguably too sharp. Vignette is usually auto-corrected by most software you use to read the RAW file. So why bother worrying about them, plus as they say – if you are pixel peeping to decide whether it is a good photo, it’s not.

Fast focus

Autofocus ability though, is very important. It is between being the masterpiece or epic fail. And it is one of the reasons I chose the F2 version over the F1.4 version. Fujifilm quotes the AF to be 0.08s. With my X-T3, the focus is almost instant and bang on target 9/10. I have rarely missed a shot because the focus is too slow. Although auto-focus is amazingly fast and quiet, the manual focus is not quite the same story. Like most other Fuji’s lenses, they are focus by wire which is essentially an electronic sensor. So they don’t have a definite endpoint on either end. And it’s not linear focus either, it makes fast manual focus a bit challenging as you can’t really have a “muscle memory” when the focus throw is essentially infinity. On top of that, they make this weird, loud, clicky noise as you turn the focus ring during manual focus mode which contrasts how quiet it focuses during AF mode.

Compact

The size of this is also one of my major considerations. Like all my previous post, I like a good compact system so I bring the camera with me more. With it being only 107g and 60x46mm, it might not be a pancake but it is small enough that it fits in my sling bag with my X-T3. The small size does come with a little bit of compromise though. The filter size is 43mm. It can be a bit difficult to find the right size filter, such as some of the popular diffusion filters like the moment’s cinebloom don’t come in this thread size and using a filter adaptor on this lens for let’s say, street photography, I find can look a bit awkward.

Depth of field

For a fast prime lens, bokeh is one of its attraction. The 35mmF2 actually creates some really nice separations. The bokeh balls are very gentle and soft so it’s not distracting at all. Although F1.4 will give you an even better separation, I am happy to trade that 1 stop for the weather-sealing and faster autofocus. I also love the clickiness of the aperture ring and it is not easy to be bumped.

Image stabilisation

The 35F2 doesn’t have optical stabilisation. If you have an X-T4, the IBIS will be quite clutch in a low light situation to let you handheld at a slower shutter speed. As I personally don’t mind some grain or noise in my photos, it hasn’t really bothered me a huge amount as I just crank up my ISO to compensate for my shutter speed.

Verdict

Fujifilm has really nailed it with the 35mm F2.0. It is more compact, quieter, snappier and cheaper than their older, best-selling lens 35mm F1.4. Every detail is well thought out, full metal construction feels premium, the different textured rings provide decent grips even in wet condition compliments with their weather seal property. With it costing just under £380, I would seriously recommend it to every Fujifilm X shooter out there. Although with the clicked aperture ring and the non-linear focus ring, it is a lens geared towards photographers rather than videographers. If you are already a prime lens shooter, you will understand what I mean by it is actually very liberating with the limitations that come with a prime lens. 

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